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sydneyst
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 Posted: Wed Feb 17th, 2010 09:24 am

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NASA Rescues Florida Sea Turtles Suffering from Cold
 
http://freerangetalk.com/?p=22084



The cold snap in Florida has caused loggerhead and green sea turtles to slip into a death-like hibernation and to seek warmer refuge., One of the refuge sites for the turtles is the Merrit Island National Wildlife Refuge on Florida’s Space Coast.  
Law Enforcement Ranger Robert Romer was patrolling the Mosquito Lagoon on the night of Jan. 4 when some fishermen alerted him to a distressed turtle on the shore. By the end of the next day, a full-fledged rescue operation was under way to save nearly 500 turtles suffering from the cold. 
 

 “We knew they were hurting,” said Hallberg. “We collected these in 30 minutes and had to come in — it was getting too cold.” Volunteers will continue to care for the turtles until the weather warms up and the turtles can be safely released back into the wild.…

Last edited on Wed Feb 17th, 2010 09:26 am by sydneyst

sydneyst
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 Posted: Sat Jan 30th, 2010 07:43 am

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Sea Turtle Gets Artificial Flipper

 http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2008/02/080229-turtle-picture.html



turtle with artifical swimming


February 29, 2008—A three-year-old green sea turtle with only one flipper may be the first sea turtle to be fitted with a prosthetic appendage.

The turtle was found in 2005 with fresh predator wounds, probably from a shark, said Jeff George, a curator at Sea Turtle, Inc., a South Padre Island, Texas-based turtle rescue organization.

Now the University of Texas Dental Branch in Houston is molding the artificial flipper, experimenting with different types of silicon to determine which has the most appropriate density, George said.

The flipper may have to be replaced every five or ten years, depending on how it is attached to the growing turtle, he said.  Some green sea turtles are believed to live well over a hundred years in the wild, and they grow slowly.

Named Allison, the turtle currently weighs 18 pounds (8 kilograms), and she could grow to 550 pounds (250 kilograms), George said. Her keepers will be able to control her growth rate, to some extent, by limiting or increasing her food.

Green sea turtles can live in captivity with two flippers and are routinely released into the wild if they have three of their original four flippers, George said. But those with one flipper can't swim properly and don't usually survive.

"We're not even thinking of releasing this turtle," George said.

Other marine animals have worn prostheses successfully. For example, a dolphin in Japan was outfitted with an artificial tailfin, according to scientists at Okinawa Churaumi Aquarium who have made improvements to the fin since the first model was attached in 2003.
—Rebecca Carroll


 

Last edited on Sat Jan 30th, 2010 06:57 pm by sydneyst

sydneyst
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 Posted: Sat Jan 30th, 2010 07:23 am

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Story of the Bald Eagle That Got a New Beak

http://www.newsvine.com/_news/2008/06/06/1547434-eagle-wounded-by-poacher-gets-new-beak-new-look

Jun 6, 2008 7:40 AM EDT
Nicholas K. Geranios, Associated Press Writer



Biologist Jane Fink Cantwell, holds Beauty, a bald eagle, after a surgery to give her an artificial beak more than three years after a poacher shot off her upper beak, Monday, May 19, 2008, in St. Maries, Idaho. A final beak made of tougher material was later attached. (AP Photo/Young Kwak)


More than three years after a poacher shot off her upper beak, a bald eagle named Beauty can finally live up to her name — with the help of volunteers. A team attached an artificial beak to the 15-pound eagle in mid-May, improving her appearance and, more importantly, helping her grasp food.

A wild eagle that must be hand-fed by humans would eventually have to be euthanized, especially since her life span could run four more decades, said Jane Fink Cantwell, who took Beauty to her raptor recovery center in Idaho two years ago.

The bird was found in 2005 scrounging for food and slowly starving at a landfill in Alaska. A bullet had taken from her curved upper beak, leaving her tongue and sinuses exposed, with a stump useless for grasping food. Cantwell said eating with her beak was like using one chopstick. She also had trouble drinking and couldn't preen her feathers.

Beauty was taken to a bird recovery center in Anchorage, where she was hand-fed while her caretakers waited in vain for a new beak to grow. Cantwell in 2007 agreed to take the eagle to her Birds of Prey Northwest ranch. Every day she used tongs to feed Beauty food, such as strips of salmon.

During a speaking engagement in Boise, she met Calvin, who offered to design an artificial beak." As an engineer, as a human being first, I was interested in helping it out," Calvin said.  Molds were made of the remaining beak and scanned into a computer so the artificial beak could be created accurately.  The nylon-composite beak will help the bird drink and grip food.


The procedure took place in the garage of Cantwell's neighbor, in front of reporters and guests. Beauty was laid on her back, fully conscious, with a ribbon of veterinary wrap around her wings. Her talons were wrapped in a leather strap.

"Everybody better be still and quiet," Cantwell told visitors. "Let's be mindful she's a nervous, wild animal."

A gold and titanium pin was glued to the remnant of her upper beak to serve as the guide for sliding the artificial beak into place.

The volunteers moved slowly and talked softly as they slipped the beak on and off, making minor adjustments. A grinder, sander and scissors were used to trim both the artificial beak and the existing remnant of upper beak. The bird sometimes nipped harmlessly at their hands.

About an hour and a half into the procedure, Beauty lurched upright and spread her wings, snapping the wrap. She hovered above the table, screeching, with Cantwell and the other handler holding the leather straps.

After a couple of minutes, they calmed the eagle and got her back onto the table, then completed the procedure.  The Boeing Co. and a maker of synthetic skin in California have volunteered to help make the permanent beak.

After the surgery, Cantwell cradled the eagle and prepared to return Beauty to her aviary, saying: "The eagle has landed, and she has a beak."














Last edited on Sat Jan 30th, 2010 06:58 pm by sydneyst

sydneyst
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 Posted: Sat Feb 21st, 2009 09:04 pm

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More on Animal Losses from Australia's Deadly Fire

exerpts from AP article, February 11,2009

http://www.suntimes.com/news/world/1425046,w-animals-killed-australia-fires-021109.article

SYDNEY---- Kangaroo corpses lay scattered by the roadsides while wombats that survived the wildfire's onslaught emerged from their underground burrows to find blackened earth and nothing to eat.



Wildlife rescue officials on Wednesday worked frantically to help the animals that made it through Australia's worst-ever wildfires but they said millions of animals likely perished in the inferno.
Scores of kangaroos have been found around roads, where they were overwhelmed by flames and smoke while attempting to flee, said Jon Rowdon, president of the rescue group Wildlife Victoria.

Kangaroos that survived are suffering from burned feet, a result of their territorial behavior. After escaping the initial flames, the creatures -- which prefer to stay in one area -- likely circled back to their homes, singeing their feet on the smoldering ground.

"It's just horrific," said Neil Morgan, president of the Statewide Wildlife Rescue Emergency Service in Victoria, the state where the raging fires were still burning. "It's disaster all around for humans and animals as well."

Some wombats that hid in their burrows managed to survive the blazes, but those that are not rescued face a slow and certain death as they emerge to find their food supply gone, said Pat O'Brien, president of the Wildlife Protection Association of Australia.

The official human death toll stood at 209 from the weekend's deadly fires which occurred in Victoria state, just north of Melbourne.  More than 1,800 homes were destroyed and more than 450,000 hectares burned.     




Last edited on Sun Feb 22nd, 2009 11:27 am by sydneyst

sydneyst
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 Posted: Sat Feb 21st, 2009 08:53 pm

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Koalas Rescued in Australia Fire Storm

View the following youtube video for dramatic video of koala rescue:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=35FT5DymIHU

Please note that the video was taken after the back-burning operation to protect animals and habitat from raging fires.  The main fires that devasted habitat occurred a week later.

Last edited on Sun Feb 22nd, 2009 11:16 am by sydneyst

sydneyst
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 Posted: Sat Feb 21st, 2009 02:44 pm

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Newfoundland Dolphins Rescued by Locals

National Geographic has posted a video about the rescue of 3 dolphins trapped by ice in Seal Cove Newfoundland.

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2009/02/090220-dolphin-video-ap.html

Last edited on Sun Mar 8th, 2009 07:00 pm by sydneyst


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