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Plight of Elephant Society
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sydneyst
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 Posted: Mon Oct 27th, 2014 11:41 pm

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Marchers Stand Up for Elephants in 130 Cities

http://voices.nationalgeographic.com/2014/10/05/on-the-march-in-washington-d-c-for-elephants-and-rhinos/




Last edited on Mon Oct 27th, 2014 11:45 pm by sydneyst

sydneyst
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 Posted: Tue Sep 30th, 2014 10:48 pm

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sydneyst
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 Posted: Tue Sep 30th, 2014 09:27 pm

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Global March in 123 Cities to Protect Elephants




find the march nearest you:

http://condofire.com/2014/04/11/global-march-for-elephants-and-rhinos-october-4th-2014-find-your-city/

Last edited on Tue Sep 30th, 2014 09:34 pm by sydneyst

sydneyst
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 Posted: Fri Jan 22nd, 2010 06:33 am

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CITES To Determine Plight of Elephants:
March 2010 conference in Doha.

 1/20/2010


from sheldrickwildlifetrust.org

The integrity and credibility of the International organization established to regulate the trade in Endangered Species, namely CITES or the International Convention for Trade in Endangered Species, has long been questionable, mainly  because of this organization’s blatant bias towards trade over and above its mandate of safeguarding the world’s endangered species. 

Sadly, today’s world seems to have lost ethics about what is right and what is wrong.   Greed and corruption sway decisions that adversely affect our fragile planet and the teeth of the world’s largest living land mammal – the elephant – have become a very hot political issue.



 In March 2010 at Doha in the Middle East, the l5th Conference of the Parties that are signatories to the CITES Convention will seal the ultimate fate of Elephants in Africa, and certainly those remaining in East and Central Africa when Tanzania and Zambia will seek authority to sell their ivory stockpiles. 

Either the elephants will be granted a reprieve through the imposition of another (this time long-term) international ivory trade ban, or the demise of the world’s elephants will be sealed simply because signatories to the Convention selfishly seek trade with ivory consuming Nations above the survival of the elephants.   The main consumers of both legal and illegal ivory are, of course, the Far Eastern countries of the world, mainly China, Thailand and Japan all of whom are important trading partners of the West, so the elephants have always been the pawns in a political game of trade.  

Last edited on Fri Jan 22nd, 2010 06:33 am by sydneyst

sydneyst
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 Posted: Sat Nov 7th, 2009 10:41 am

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PETA Protests Elephant Abuse in Oregon
 
http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/unleashed/2009/10/peta-protests-car-washing-elephants-in-oregon-wildlife-park.html

sydneyst
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 Posted: Tue Feb 17th, 2009 05:32 am

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Disturbing Elephant News from Amboseli

The Elephant Sanctuary at elephant.com reports increasing poaching and slaughter of elephants in Amboseli.

excerpts:

Summary

Picture right: Cynthia Moss, elephant researcher


We have some very disturbing news from Amboseli. The situation for elephants in the area has become critical over the past year and more particularly over the past four months. Elephants are being wounded and killed by spears, poison arrows and bullets at an alarming rate. For the first time in many years, tusks are being removed by unknown persons. Through our investigations we have discovered that the ivory is being sold at 3000/- shillings ($38) per kilo. Most of the ivory is reported to be going across the border into Tanzania. Unless this killing and the trade are stopped now, the famous Amboseli elephants will be decimated.

sydneyst
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 Posted: Wed Feb 11th, 2009 12:25 am

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Suit Against Ringling Brothers Begins

Last week, a US District court began hearing arguments over a suit filed against Ringling Brothers by the ASPCA for violations of the Endangered Species Act.  The case revolves around harsh and inhuman treatment of elephants which are listed as a threatened species. This is the first time ESA has been invoked to protect captive  wildlife.

http://blogs.wsj.com/law/2009/02/03/ringling-bros-elephants-and-the-endangered-species-act/

Last edited on Wed Feb 11th, 2009 12:28 am by sydneyst

sydneyst
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 Posted: Wed Jan 14th, 2009 08:31 am

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Elephants 'die earlier in zoos' 
 
The Journal Science recently reported the results of study comparing the lifespan of female elephants in captivity versus those living in the wild. The study focused on the lives of more than 4,500 individuals, comparing wild elephants in Kenya's Amboseli National Park with working elephants in the Burmese logging industry and zoo elephant populations in Europe.


It's main conclusions are as follows:


1. Zoo elephants live significantly shorter lives. The average lifespan in captivity was only 19 years compared with 56 years in the wild.


2.  Zoo elephants  become obese and stressed, living a boring repetitive life style.


3. For African elephants, Rates of mortality amongst zoo-born Asian elephants were two to three times higher than for those born in the logging camps. 


BBC photo of female herd in Africa
 
4. One risk factor for Asian zoo elephants is being moved between institutions, with early removal from the mother tending to have additional adverse effects.

Analysis of the lives of these working Asian elephants was based on data collected by Dr khuune Mar, a professor at Sheffield University. 

 She found that working elephants lived to an average of 40 years compared to 19 years of zoo elephants. For about half of each day,   Burmese working elephants are allowed to live naturally and interact with other elephants.


"We keep working elephants in the workforce for no more than six to eight hours a day. For the remaining hours we let them loose in the forest, they live like wild elephants, they can meet and mate with wild elephants, they have a full elephant life, good exercise and good food," she said.


BBC Photo; Dr. K. Mar.

Burmese logging elephants can roam free in the forest for some of the time
Dr Mar says there are lessons from the treatment of these working elephants that could be taken on board by zoos.  "They have a very monotonous lifestyle, every day is the same for zoo elephants, they have to live in the same compound, with limited roaming, this makes them more stressed," she said.

 
"They need a huge home range, more systematic enrichment, bigger compounds, grooming areas, mud wallows, hills."


She says its important to allow them the freedom to behave naturally and has a straightforward message for zoos.


"If the zoo does not have space, its simple - don't take elephants."

For more see the following:
http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/abstract/322/5908/1649
 http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/7777413.stm
 


Last edited on Tue Feb 17th, 2009 06:38 pm by sydneyst

Rolf, Innsbruck
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 Posted: Tue Apr 22nd, 2008 12:06 am

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I am very concerned about the plight of elephants and was delighted by the article.
With more and more desert, I fear that the situation will worsen.  Elephants are heavily dependent on water which is one of the reasons they migrate to the Okavengo.  People who poach should severely prosecuted.

One thing seldom talked about is too many people on too little land.  We can't control the land because it is fixed but we can lessen population growth rates.

Jim Currie
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 Posted: Tue Mar 11th, 2008 09:16 am

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see http://www.sydneysthumb.com/fergiesviewlatest.html for Fergie's Latest Spout:


Time to Organize and Protect Elephants
The imperiled plight of elephants really chaps my hide. The recent articles in Nature and the New York Times (and now Sydney's Thumb) show that elephant society is in trouble. Habitat is shrinking across the globe because of population pressure and deforestation; poaching continues despite international pressures; and the "culling" or management killing of healthy elephants has disrupted herds.






Last edited on Tue Mar 11th, 2008 09:34 am by


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