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Endangered Wild Elephants
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sydneyst
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 Posted: Sat Oct 3rd, 2009 08:50 am

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Elephant Poaching Threat Undiminished: Kenya Bust

from Sheldrick Trust:
  1. Kenya seizes massive ivory haul - 10/1/2009



sydneyst
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 Posted: Tue Apr 14th, 2009 09:07 pm

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West Africa Nations Agree to Protect Elephants

excerpt:


Bonn, 9 April 2009 - At the first meeting of the signatories to the CMS agreement to conserve West African populations of the African Elephant, governments and international conservation bodies agreed on steps to stop the depletion and the loss of their habitat. Representatives of 13 West African countries as well as wildlife agencies attended the meeting in Accra, Ghana on 30-31 March 2009. A joint meeting of representatives from CMS and the CITES programme MIKE (Monitoring the Illegal Killing of Elephants) also took place the following day in Accra.

In West Africa, major declines of elephant populations occurred well before the turn of the 20th century and the population has remained at low levels ever since. The loss of habitat and illegal killing has raised deep concerns about the future of this endangered, highly charismatic species. An estimated 90 per cent of elephants' habitat in West Africa has been destroyed. Elephant habitats include both humid forest and the arid Sahel. With human settlements encroaching ever further into elephant habitats, elephants have less space and the number of human-elephant conflicts is increasing. Roads and railways also split the elephant range into isolated populations. Two-thirds of the currently existing populations contain less than 100 elephants, but only larger groups have a chance for long-term survival.

see following site for elaboration on the agreement:

http://www.unep.org/Documents.Multilingual/Default.asp?DocumentID=579&ArticleID=6123&l=en


note from Fergie: Talk and Agreements are Cheap.  These populations are in dire shape because of inadequate protection.  We only hope that resources are disproportionately allocated to research and planning processes as opposed to enforcement, prevention of encroachment and decimation of animal water needs and food supply.


Last edited on Wed Apr 15th, 2009 10:46 pm by sydneyst

sydneyst
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 Posted: Tue Mar 10th, 2009 10:57 pm

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Thailand Celebrates National Elephant Day
from Thailand Press and Reuters:
Utusan Express, The Star, 14 Mar 2002
 BANGKOK - Thais honoured the elephant on Wednesday with special brunches and Buddhist ceremonies across the country to pay homage to their national animal. In Surin, 450 km (282 miles) northeast of Bangkok, 99 monks marked national elephant day with a funeral ceremony blessing elephants killed in Thailand over the last year.

``Elephants have provided numerous benefactions for Thai people and the nation - they have helped fight in wars, build towns and attract tourists,'' Surin governor Kasemsak Sanpote said. ``Therefore we organised the rite today to pay gratitude to them on their special day.''
Elephant camps across Thailand celebrated the occasion with special feasts. An elephant centre in Ayutthaya province, north of Bangkok held a brunch buffet for 40 elephants.


Ayutthaya Elephant Club owner Sompast Meepan told Reuters the club prepared two tonnes of special fruit including rose apples, watermelons, and pineapples. ``Watermelon is the elephants' favourite, like chocolate is the favourite of children,'' he said. ``Since it is their day, we want them to be very happy today.'' - Reuters


 

What concerns Sydney and Friends is that wild elephants seem to be left out of the discussion and celebration.  No one seems to be asking if the best way to celebrate elephants is to protect their habitat from encroachment. In addition, much of the celebration seems to assume that humans have the right to dominate elephants and use them for their own industry.  There may have been a time that this could be justified, but now we have learned much about elephant society and the effects that humans have on it by breaking up family units and depriving elephants of their ordinary and natural interaction. 

 A good way to celebrate elephant day is to donate to the causes that rescue orphan elephants, prevent habitat destruction and poaching. In addition, people should consider donating to the new sterilization technology that will enable elephants to survive without ruthless culling.  


Last edited on Tue Mar 10th, 2009 11:15 pm by sydneyst

sydneyst
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 Posted: Mon Sep 15th, 2008 07:35 am

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Tesso Nilo Park Expanded

On August 28, the government of Indonesia announced plans to expand the size of  Sumatra’s Tesso Nilo National Park from 94,00  to 213,000 acres by the end of the year. An additional 47,000 acres will be added to the "national park management area," expanding it to 250,000 acres.

Tesso Nilo is one of the last havens for endangered Sumatran elephants and critically endangered Sumatran tigers.

The park was created in 2004 but only 94,000 acres of forest were initially  included.  The World Wildlife Fund, which has been an advocate of expansion, praised the development.  Stated WWF US President, Carter Roberts,“This is a momentous decision that offers hope for some of the planet’s most spectacular wildlife and forests."

He added,  “There is still much to do, however, as Sumatra’s forests continue to disappear to feed the growing global demand for pulp, paper and palm oil.”

Tesso Nilo is also renown for the highest lowland forest plant biodiversity on the planet, with more than 4,000 plant species documented and many other species yet to be discovered. The province is under dramatically increasing threat from the pulp and paper industry, clearing of forest for palm oil plantations and illegal settlements.

 

Last edited on Mon Sep 15th, 2008 09:07 pm by sydneyst

sydneyst
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 Posted: Tue Aug 26th, 2008 09:37 pm

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More on Tesso Nilo's Amazing Wildlife and How the Park Was Established

Tesso Nilo, the lowland forest in central is Sumatra is one of the most biodiverse ecotones on the planet.  It is the last  haven for Sumatran tigers and elephants, and according to WWF, the home to three per cent of the world’s mammal species. Plant species are also abundant with over  4,000 species recorded so far.

The park designation arrived at the 11th hour following years of  deforestation, agricultural incursion and human settlement.  Fifty years ago, nearly the entire island was covered with forest. 

The initial park proposal called for the establishment of a 155,000-hectare reserve,  but because much of this area was held by private logging companies unwilling to grant major concessions, the park had to be downsized to 38,576 hectares. 

Unlike an American national park, Tesso Nilo includes harvestable acreage (timber, agriculture, mining)  in close proximity to endangered species.  Species protection is exacerbated by illegal (unpermitted) operations and inadequate government enforcement.


In May 2006, Indonesian officials agreed to expand the 330 km² park to 1,000 km², but have yet to make good on the promise.


Last edited on Mon Sep 1st, 2008 06:32 am by sydneyst

sydneyst
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 Posted: Tue Aug 26th, 2008 06:59 pm

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Elephant Patrols in Sumatra Lessening Wild Elephant Attacks

National Geographic has posted a video on use of domesticated elephants to prevent attacks by wild elephants.  The video highlights the reduction in recent attacks but doesn't say much about the provocation for the attacks which is the incursion of settlers into  Tesso Nilo National Park.  The premise behind the program is that reducing the attacks on the settlers will lessen the killing of elephants by those who have moved into their range.  Sumatra elephants are under great threat of extinction.


At 212 sq. miles, Tesso Nilo is the largest coherent patch of forest left in Sumatra.  It was designated a national park in 2004 after a major international effort by conservation NGO's.  At the time, it was believed that the designation would insure at survival of small numbers of tigers and elephant.  This assumption has been heavily tested by recent  expansion of timber havest and other human activities.  
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2008/08/080813-elephants-video-ap.html
photo: Conservation International


Attached Image (viewed 272 times):

tessoelephantsci.gif

Last edited on Wed Aug 27th, 2008 08:53 am by sydneyst


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