Sydney's Forum Home

Search
   
Members

Calendar

Help

Home
Search by username
Not logged in - Login | Register 


species extinction
 Moderated by: Fergie Bear  

New Topic

Reply

Print
AuthorPost
sydneyst
Administrator


Joined: Mon Mar 10th, 2008
Location: Seattle, USA
Posts: 1082
Status:  Offline
 Posted: Fri Nov 13th, 2009 10:04 pm

Quote

Reply


Dear Fergie,



Bowing to a lawsuit brought by the Center for Biological Diversity and allies, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service today agreed to cease implementation of its "three strikes, you're out" policy requiring that Mexican gray wolves be shot or trapped if they kill three cows on federal land within one year.

This ill-conceived policy has cost many endangered Mexican gray wolves their lives, severely undermining the federal recovery program. While wolf populations have steadily grown in the northern Rockies and Great Lakes, where the "three strikes" rule does not apply, the southwestern wolf population has remained small and stagnant, leaving Mexican gray wolves one of the most endangered mammals in North America.

The Fish and Wildlife Service also agreed to stop deferring its crucial wildlife authority to state and federal agencies such as Arizona Game and Fish and the USDA Wildlife Service (the agency in charge of killing and shooting wolves), which have consistently acted to prevent wolf recovery.

Thanks to all of you who wrote letters, sent faxes, and made phone calls to push the Obama administration to settle this suit and put the Mexican gray wolf recovery program back on track.

With this issue off the table, the feds can now concentrate on the Center's three petitions to create a new recovery plan, formally list the southwestern wolf as a distinct endangered species, and reform the recovery program from top to bottom.

¡Viva el lobo!



Kierán Suckling
Executive Director
Center for Biological Diversity

Last edited on Fri Nov 13th, 2009 10:05 pm by sydneyst

sydneyst
Administrator


Joined: Mon Mar 10th, 2008
Location: Seattle, USA
Posts: 1082
Status:  Offline
 Posted: Thu Aug 27th, 2009 06:58 pm

Quote

Reply
CBD Replies To Fergie's  Letter on Bat Crisis



Fergie,

Thanks for your email. There is a lot we don’t know about white-nose syndrome, but there is also a lot we can do right now to address the problem. We are calling on the Fish and Wildlife Service to spend more money on monitoring and research, and to put more pressure on congress to allocate additional funds. We are also asking them to reduce the level of allowed killing and harming of these bats from other sources (logging, mining, development, etc.) as it doesn’t make sense to cause them additional stress.

We do think the current level of research and monitoring is inadequate, and we get this straight from the scientists and agencies who are trying take action. The threat is unparalleled, but the amount of funds being made available are not very large.

In short, we think there is much to be gained from putting pressure on the Department of Interior to get more involved and to develop a plan for how it intends to respond.

Kieran Suckling
Executive Director
Center for Biological Diversity
POB 710, Tucson  AZ 85702
http://www.biologicaldiversity.org


Last edited on Sat Aug 29th, 2009 08:15 pm by sydneyst

sydneyst
Administrator


Joined: Mon Mar 10th, 2008
Location: Seattle, USA
Posts: 1082
Status:  Offline
 Posted: Wed Aug 26th, 2009 07:24 pm

Quote

Reply
Fergie Responds to CBD on Bat Crisis

Subject: RE: Bats Need Urgent Help, Contact Fish and Wildlife

Dear Kieran and Friends at CBD,


I share your concern about the bats but my understanding is that root causes are still up in the air and dictate further research. I've included the USFWS report below.

Do you think the research is inadequate? I don't see the value in creating a plan  when the pathogenic causes and contributing factors are yet to be established. I know there are theories about the specific infestation but question are unresolved about why suddenly it is affecting the bats.  What role are climate and weather playing? What role, food supply? Why aren't the bats able to deal with the infestation?

If you think the research and analysis demand a research plan or that it is inadequate, that is another matter.  I think it's incumbent upon the CBD to make this case, if that's your position. 

I do think it might be appropriate to ask whether interim measure could be taken until all the research is in, but I'm not conversant enough in the specifics to know if this is reasonable.  This is something that I think you should research prior to launching a petition drive.

I'll pass this to a couple of scientists who are Friends of Sydney's Thumb.  These include a vet in upstate NY, an entomologist, pathologist, endocrinologist.



Fergie


Last edited on Wed Aug 26th, 2009 07:25 pm by sydneyst

sydneyst
Administrator


Joined: Mon Mar 10th, 2008
Location: Seattle, USA
Posts: 1082
Status:  Offline
 Posted: Wed Aug 26th, 2009 07:21 pm

Quote

Reply


Dear Fergie,
Preliminary reports this summer all tell the same story: Several species of bats are virtually gone in the Northeast. White-nose syndrome -- the disease that has been wiping out bats over the past two winters -- is expected to strike new areas this winter, including some of the world's largest bat caves in Tennessee, Kentucky, and other southern and midwestern states. Bats are on a clear trajectory toward oblivion.

Yet from the beginning, the nation's lead wildlife agency, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, has failed to respond with the urgency that's desperately needed to save bats from complete catastrophe. At least a million and a half bats are already dead, but the Service has yet to develop a plan of action or coordinate the agency's efforts to stop white-nose syndrome.

Sam Hamilton, the agency's new director, must put white-nose syndrome at the top of his list. Please send a message today urging Director Hamilton to create a white-nose syndrome plan immediately to prevent the complete unraveling of America's bat populations. Bats cannot afford another winter like the two we've just witnessed.


Click here to find out more and take action.



Sample letter:
Subject: Fish and Wildlife Service Needs a Bat Plan Now

In your new position as director of the Fish and Wildlife Service, your first priority needs to be the unprecedented crisis of white-nose syndrome, the disease that has been wiping out bats from New York to West Virginia over the last two winters. Service leadership has been sorely lacking on this issue; without swift action, we stand to lose several species in the next two to three years.

State wildlife agencies lack the personnel and resources to respond effectively to the overwhelming catastrophe of white-nose; bat ecologists, pathologists, epidemiologists, and other scientists associated with academia and independent research institutions have been striving valiantly to pitch in with the research effort, but their work can only go so far with limited resources. Overall, a lack of clear coordination, communication, and focus has thwarted an effective response to the disease, and this coming winter, with white-nose syndrome poised to strike some of the largest hibernating bat caves in the world, the need for leadership and a concrete plan is more urgent than ever.

The Service has been guilty of downplaying this disease and demurring from stating the need for additional funding, even when asked directly by members of Congress. While individual Service biologists have worked extremely hard to cope with the bat crisis on top of all their regular duties, it simply is not working for the agency to patch together a ragtag effort while other urgent wildlife programs are neglected. Lack of resources in these tough fiscal times is a reality for everyone, but the Service should be upfront that this is a desperate wildlife crisis and that only with additional resources is there a chance that the disease can be understood well enough to stop it in time.

I urge you to develop a plan for white-nose syndrome this fall, before bat deaths commence again this winter. This plan should be created in cooperation with other federal agencies, with the Fish and Wildlife Service taking the lead role. The plan should clearly state research needs, strategies for protecting affected species, and a system for efficiently coordinating communication and decision-making among the various federal and state agencies and private entities involved. The appointment of a full-time, national white-nose syndrome coordinator is a critical first step.

Ultimately, the nation's wildlife- and habitat-management agencies must come together to create a system for responding to sudden crises and newly emergent diseases like white-nose syndrome, chronic wasting disease, and chytrid fungus in amphibians. The nature of wildlife conservation is shifting with our changing global environment. We must have honest, effective, committed, and cooperative leadership if our wildlife species are to have a chance of surviving into the future.



Please take action by October 31, 2009.

sydneyst
Administrator


Joined: Mon Mar 10th, 2008
Location: Seattle, USA
Posts: 1082
Status:  Offline
 Posted: Mon Aug 24th, 2009 07:30 pm

Quote

Reply
Demise of North American Bat Continues; Mystery Unresolved

excerpts from USFWS site:


Credit: Nancy Heaslip, New York Dept. of Environmental Conservation

 

Credit: courtesy of Cal Butchkoski, Pennsylvania Game Commission More maps

In February 2006 some 40 miles west of Albany, N.Y., a caver photographed hibernating bats with an unusual white substance on their muzzles. He noticed several dead bats. The following winter, bats behaving erratically, bats with white noses and a few hundred dead bats in several caves came to the attention of New York Department of Environmental Conservation biologists, who documented white-nose syndrome in January 2007. Hundreds of thousands of hibernating bats have died since. Biologists with state and federal agencies and organizations across the country are still trying to find the answer to this deadly mystery.

We have found sick, dying and dead bats in unprecedented numbers in and around caves and mines from Vermont to Virginia. In some hibernaculum, 90 to 100 percent of the bats are dying.

...Despite the continuing search to find the source of this condition by numerous laboratories and state and federal biologists, the cause of the bat deaths remains unknown. Recent identification of a cold-loving fungus could be a step toward an answer.
State and Service biologists are:
  • Winter monitoring of signs of WNS in caves and mines has been completed;
  • Service and state biologists are compiling data from the biennial winter count of Indiana bats;
  • Bat field work during early summer 2009 includes mist-netting* to determine the presence of bats and monitoring of known maternity colonies (groups of females that raise their young together) of little brown, big brown or Indiana bats. Monitoring can vary from counting bats as they emerge at sunset to attaching radio transmitters and following their roosting and feeding behaviors *(A mist net is a grid of thin nylon strands. Set between two upright poles, it resembles a large volleyball net. Mist-netting poses minimal risk of injury to trapped bats.);
  • Service and other federal biologists along with state and academic biologists attended a meeting in May 2009 hosted by Bat Conservation International to discuss potential avenues of research;
  • Service, state, U.S. Geological Survey and National Park Service biologists met in May 2009 to develop strategies to control the spread and minimize the impacts of WNS. We have initiated a structured decision-making process to identify potential management options that could be implemented as soon as winter 2009-2010. The initial phase of the SDM process is nearing completion, and efforts are now under way to critically evaluate all potential management actions based on the most current scientific information;
  • The Service, in conjunction with many partners, is supporting experimental treatment of WNS-affected captive bats with damaged wings;
  • The U.S. Geological Survey has initiated a pilot study to determine if WNS can be identified in affected vs. unaffected bats through genetic analyses;
  • Service biologists and managers are working with commercial cave operators, caving groups, outing clubs, karst conservancies and others in several states, including Indiana, Kentucky, North Carolina, Virginia and Tennessee, to slow the potential spread of WNS; and
  • Service biologists are assisting in developing and distributing new information about WNS (e.g., WNS video at http://www.cavebiota.com/).
June 3, 2009

Last edited on Mon Aug 24th, 2009 07:32 pm by sydneyst

sydneyst
Administrator


Joined: Mon Mar 10th, 2008
Location: Seattle, USA
Posts: 1082
Status:  Offline
 Posted: Sun Aug 23rd, 2009 09:30 pm

Quote

Reply
Video Capsulizes Gorilla Threat in Virunga National Park

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7nKfRWGOMLs
photo: Dr. Lucy Spellman


Last edited on Sun Aug 23rd, 2009 09:34 pm by sydneyst

sydneyst
Administrator


Joined: Mon Mar 10th, 2008
Location: Seattle, USA
Posts: 1082
Status:  Offline
 Posted: Tue Aug 18th, 2009 07:45 pm

Quote

Reply
Extinction Numbers Are Staggering

from Center for Biological Diversity

Here's what most people don't know:

● Up to 30,000 species per year are going extinct: three per hour.
● 50 percent of all primates and 100 percent of all great apes are threatened with extinction.
● Three of the world's eight tiger subspecies became extinct in the past 60 years; the remaining five are all endangered.
● Humans have already driven 20 percent of all birds extinct.
● 12 percent of mammals, 12 percent of birds, 31 percent of reptiles, 30 percent of amphibians, and 37 percent of fish are threatened with extinction.2

Together we can help millions of people see the terrible consequences of thoughtless consumption and weak environmental policies. We'll show that it's not too late to save our fellow earthlings.


Sydney: See below article from Science Daily and Nature on revised estimates of extinction rates

Last edited on Wed Aug 26th, 2009 07:29 pm by sydneyst

sydneyst
Administrator


Joined: Mon Mar 10th, 2008
Location: Seattle, USA
Posts: 1082
Status:  Offline
 Posted: Mon Aug 10th, 2009 09:46 pm

Quote

Reply
Desert Turtles Imperiled

from the Center for Biological Diversity:

Dear Fergie,



Last year, more than 250 desert tortoises died after a disastrous attempt by the Army to relocate 600 of the imperiled tortoises to make way for a tank-warfare training area in the California desert. Now, the Army and the Bureau of Land Management are rushing forward with a plan to move over 1,000 more tortoises -- and have given the public a tiny, 15-day window of opportunity to voice comments on this lethal proposal.

This misguided attempt at translocation will inflict a massive blow to the federally threatened desert tortoise population -- we must demand a full review of impacts to the tortoise and its environment before any tortoises are moved. It's a matter of life and death.


Please, write to the Bureau of Land Management today
asking that they extend the deadline for public comment by 60 days and carry out a full environmental review, including a comprehensive "environmental impact statement," before executing more of these deadly moves.

sydneyst
Administrator


Joined: Mon Mar 10th, 2008
Location: Seattle, USA
Posts: 1082
Status:  Offline
 Posted: Fri Aug 7th, 2009 08:01 pm

Quote

Reply
Charcoal Production and Guerrillas Pose Threat to Virunga Gorillas

Illegal charcoal production is a main threat to mountain gorillas in Virunga National Park’s where it is estimated that in one year, 20 percent of the southern sector of the park was deforested.


just

The Biomass Briquettes Project may be the solution to this alarming problem.  Leaves, grass, scrap paper, coffee husks and other products are pressed into briquettes.   Using briquettes, which heat faster than charcoal, will slow down the rate of deforestation, reduce poverty and preserve the habitat for gorillas.

In a press release issued today, the Congolese National Park Authorities have sent specially trained rangers in the “biggest ever deployment of armed rangers” to combat charcoal-making operations in the Virunga National Park.   It is estimated the illegal trade, run by armed groups, generates nearly $30 million in revenue.  In the past week, over 250 charcoal kilns have been destroyed and over 50 people have been arrested in the operation.

How to Help Virunga Guardians are people who generously donate $25 a month to help protect 30-acre sections of the Park.  Currently, 63 areas are protected by Guardians.  If you would like to support Kadogo and the effort to protect these magnificent gorillas, please visit the website for further information.

All photos courtesy of Gorilla CD.

sydneyst
Administrator


Joined: Mon Mar 10th, 2008
Location: Seattle, USA
Posts: 1082
Status:  Offline
 Posted: Mon Jun 29th, 2009 07:20 pm

Quote

Reply
Wolf Protection Reinstated

report from The Center for Biological Diversity:



Dear Fergie,


Victory for Great Lakes wolves!

We're starting this week with very good breaking news: This morning we won a tremendous victory saving wolves in the Great Lakes.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has signed a legal settlement putting wolves in Minnesota, Michigan, and Wisconsin back on the endangered species list.

Without federal protection, the door was open to wolves being slaughtered at the hands of state agencies, livestock owners, and trophy hunters. The agreement is a strong positive step from an administration that has, so far, been disappointing in its treatment of endangered species in general and wolves in particular. In fact, we are still in court over the administration's stripping of Endangered Species Act protection from northern Rockies wolves. More on that later.

This victory has been a long time coming. In 2005 we won a court order striking down the Bush administration's weakening of protections for Great Lakes wolves from "endangered" to "threatened." In response, the administration removed all protection in 2007. We went back to court, and last year won a legal order striking Bush down again and restoring full protection. Then, to our dismay, the Obama administration bowed to the anti-wolf lobby, removing all protection again this April. We sued yet again, and today the administration agreed to reverse itself.

Will the administration make another run at allowing Great Lake wolves to be killed? It's too early to tell, but we'll keep a close eye on them. I can only hope the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has finally realized that we will fight them to the end to keep wolves from being slaughtered -- not only in the Great Lakes, but in the northern Rockies and the Southwest as well.

We couldn't have done it without your help. Many, many thanks for the part you've played in keeping these wolves wild and safe.

All my best, and have a great week,

Kierán Suckling
Executive Director
Center for Biological Diversity

Last edited on Mon Jun 29th, 2009 07:21 pm by sydneyst

sydneyst
Administrator


Joined: Mon Mar 10th, 2008
Location: Seattle, USA
Posts: 1082
Status:  Offline
 Posted: Thu May 14th, 2009 04:04 am

Quote

Reply
Prince Charles Releases Web Video on Plight of Rainforest

see:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CUQ1K284Ip4

sydneyst
Administrator


Joined: Mon Mar 10th, 2008
Location: Seattle, USA
Posts: 1082
Status:  Offline
 Posted: Thu May 7th, 2009 01:08 am

Quote

Reply
Video 'Expedition Grizzly' to Debut

Casey Anderson's film Expedition Grizzly debuts this week on the National Geographic Channel.  See the trailer video:

http://www.kulr8.com/news/local/44331672.html?video=YHI&t=a

from the Great Falls Tribune:

A charmer, a flirt and a really big head — from handler Casey Anderson's description, Brutus the grizzly bear sounds like a typical celebrity.

Anderson narrates footage of wild grizzlies he and a film crew recorded in Yellowstone National Park, then uses his 800-pound trained friend for up-close demonstrations of bear behavior. For example, after footage of several wild grizzlies digging through rocks in search of protein-rich moths, the program cuts to a scene of Brutus showing off his ability to move boulders to get to a piece of salmon hidden by Anderson.

"The whole concept of the show was my idea," Anderson said in a telephone interview from New York City on Friday. "It's something I've been putting together in my mind since I was a kid."

He pitched the idea to National Geographic, and officials there accepted.
To make the show, Anderson and a two-man film crew spent about 60 days, spread over the course of a year, chronicling Yellowstone grizzlies.

"It was a true expedition," Anderson said. "It wasn't like a lot of documentaries where they shoot everything from the side of the road and just make it look far away."

He had more help with Brutus' scenes, including from Great Falls resident and Tribune employee Joana Beeson, who worked as a production assistant on the show.
Anderson's hope is for the documentary to inspire appreciation of grizzlies.

"I think the take-home message is that here we have this animal that's always been part of the American heritage," he said. "This is something we should be proud of and we should cherish."

With Brutus' help, Anderson thinks he can better illustrate grizzly behavior and — more importantly — attract viewers who might not pay attention to a straightforward documentary.

Anderson is in a unique position to carry out the idea, as he has raised Brutus in a sanctuary since the grizzly was born in an overpopulated wildlife park six years ago.

Last edited on Tue Aug 18th, 2009 07:52 pm by sydneyst

sydneyst
Administrator


Joined: Mon Mar 10th, 2008
Location: Seattle, USA
Posts: 1082
Status:  Offline
 Posted: Thu Mar 26th, 2009 06:08 pm

Quote

Reply
Why the Palin Position on Belugas is Wrong

Environmental groups and marine biologists at the National Marine Fisheries Service make the following arguments in favor of listing--and at odds with assertions by Governor Palin:

1.  The Cook Inlet Belugas are a Distinct Population
All independent scientific  reviewers found the Cook Inlet population to be distinct under criteria established under ESA.

 
2. The evidence of  population decline is strong; the evidence of recent recovery is weak.   

Priot to 1999 the main cause of decline was overharvesting by Alaska Natives.  This was curtailed , but the number of whales did not increase (at a statistically significant rate). 

Population models are the conventional and best available method for determining population response and "population viability".  They reflect age structure,  reproduction and mortality rates and the factors governing them.  At odds with Palin's assertions, the scientific modelers and reviewers of the model found that despite limits on subsistence harvests, the population was not growing as hoped for.

2. The environmental factors that would push the population to the brink are only bound to increase without listing and habitat protection measures. This, combined with lack of current growth, suggests future decline. 

Federal biologists have listed 18 potential threats to the Cook Inlet whales, including whale poaching, food reduction, noise caused by oil and gas drilling, and coastal construction. Virtually all point in the direction of Beluga decline.

see the following NOAA/NMFS report on the Cook Belugas:

http://www.fakr.noaa.gov/frules/73fr62919.pdf

other info:

http://www.nrdc.org/wildlife/habitat/esa/alaska03.asp




Last edited on Fri May 8th, 2009 04:03 am by sydneyst

sydneyst
Administrator


Joined: Mon Mar 10th, 2008
Location: Seattle, USA
Posts: 1082
Status:  Offline
 Posted: Thu Mar 26th, 2009 05:55 pm

Quote

Reply
Palin Sues to Stop Listing of Beluga Whales

source: Center for Biological Diversity

On Jan. 14, 2009, the Alaska governor announced that the state had filed a 60-day notice of intent to reverse the listing of Beluga whales.  The argument was sketched out by her chief of staff published an Op-Ed in the Anchorage Daily News on Jan. 28 titled "Protection Requirements for Cook Inlet Belugas Are Silly."


Essentially the argument is that the listing is based on a remote likelihood--too remote--that the Belugas will vanish; and unproved assumptions that the whales will recover if listed.  Palin also views ESA listings as unwarranted weapon against economic development. 

She and her staff also assert that the population is stable and beginning to recover as a result of cooperative efforts between the State and the Federal Government. 

The ESA listing requires the designation of critical habitat for the whales, a recovery plan and a review of all federally funded or permitted activities in Cook Inlet. The city of Anchorage is on Cook Inlet.

Sydney and Fergie will provide reasons why this is contradicted by biological evidence and at odds with the Endangered Species Act. 

Last edited on Thu Mar 26th, 2009 08:00 pm by sydneyst

sydneyst
Administrator


Joined: Mon Mar 10th, 2008
Location: Seattle, USA
Posts: 1082
Status:  Offline
 Posted: Mon Mar 9th, 2009 08:58 pm

Quote

Reply
 

Kiwi Under Threat: New Zealanders Mobilize to Save Signature Species

Fergie: The Karori Sanctuary in New Zealand has begun a Kiwi-recovery program, just last year introducing Kiwis into the reserve, hopefully to thrive on their own.

http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2008/12/24/world/main4686100.shtml?source=RSSattr=World_4686100


excerpts:

"When we talk about the kiwi - that's our identity," said Raewyn Empson, conservation manager at the Karori Wildlife Sanctuary. "When all of a sudden you're talking about kiwi becoming extinct in our lifetime, it's a bit scary really."


The kiwi and other species are victims of their own innocence and the twists and turns of evolution and human settlement on these South Pacific islands.

Rugged and wind-swept, New Zealand is so remote that many of its animals had few enemies and never developed strong defense mechanisms.

Then, 750 years ago, man began arriving - Polynesians first, with rats in their canoes. Much later, Europeans came, bringing cats, dogs, stoats, ferrets, possums, rabbits and weasels.

The islands were a predator's paradise, and the newcomers ran riot, eating the local wildlife or stealing its lunch.

New Zealand today has one of the world's worst biodiversity depletion rates. More than 30 percent - at least 51 species - of native birds are believed to have died out, along with frogs, lizards, fish and plants, government studies say.

photo: http://www.nhc.ed.ac.uk

Attached Image (viewed 333 times):

kiwi.gif

Last edited on Mon Mar 9th, 2009 09:17 pm by sydneyst


 Current time is 05:19 am
Page:  First Page Previous Page  1  2  3  4  Next Page Last Page  




Powered by WowBB 1.7 - Copyright © 2003-2006 Aycan Gulez