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sydneyst
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 Posted: Tue Mar 16th, 2010 10:17 pm

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Last Wolverine in Michigan Found Dead

http://www.clickondetroit.com/news/22844519/detail.html

Hikers Found Wolverine Dead In Ditch POSTED: Monday, March 15, 2010UPDATED: 2:08 pm EDT March 15,2010

photo: animal planet

SANILAC COUNTY, Mich. -- Michigan's only known wolverine was found dead Saturday in Sanilac County, near where it was first spotted in 2004.A pair of hikers found the female wolverine in a ditch near a beaver dam in the Minden City State Game Area.A Michigan Department of Natural Resources and Environment said it appeared to have died of natural causes, but a necropsy will be performed at a DNRE lab at Michigan University.

...A group of coyote hunters initially spotted the animal in Ubly, about 90 miles north of Detroit in February 2004 -- nearly 200 years after the species was last seen in the state that uses the small but ferocious animal as its unofficial nickname.

The wolverine, a member of the weasel family that grows to about 25 pounds but is fierce enough to fight off bears and wolves, once ranged across the northern and western United States. It is now limited mostly to northern Canada, Idaho and Alaska, with sightings in a few other states, but its last confirmed sightings in Michigan were by fur traders in the late 1700s and early 1800s.

Last edited on Tue Mar 16th, 2010 10:22 pm by sydneyst

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 Posted: Fri Mar 12th, 2010 05:09 pm

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Tragedy of Tigers Continues: 11 Tigers Die in China Zoos

h
ttp://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/asia-pacific/8563673.stm By Michael Bristow
BBC News, Beijing
China has several thousand tigers in its parks and zoos Eleven rare Siberian tigers have died over the last three months at a zoo in north-eastern China. The local authorities believe that a lack of food contributed to their deaths, according to media reports.

The news is bound to raise concerns about the treatment of captive tigers in China, which is this year celebrating the year of the tiger.China has only about 50 tigers left in the wild, but it has about 5,000 in captivity.The tigers died at the Shenyang Forest Wild Animal Zoo in Liaoning Province. That fact was confirmed by a worker at the zoo.

But there are discrepancies about how they died.A local wildlife protection official, Liu Xiaoqiang, is reported to have said that malnutrition was one cause.The tigers were apparently fed cheap chicken bones. Mr Liu also said that the tigers had been kept in very small cages, restricting their movement and lowering their resistance to disease.A manager at the zoo, which is currently closed, said the animals simply died of various diseases.

But however the tigers died, their deaths will inevitably raise questions about how the animals are treated in China.Animal campaign groups say there is simply not enough protection for tigers held in the country's zoos and farms.A spokesman for the International Fund for Animal Welfare in Beijing said: "[The government has] given too many credentials to groups that do not have the capability of taking care of these animals."

Tiger trade In China there is also still a trade in tiger parts, which are used in traditional Chinese medicine.They are used to treat rheumatism and to strengthen bones. The BBC recently found that the Siberia Tiger Park, based in Heilongjiang Province in the northeast of China, is selling a "tiger bone wine" that contains three small tiger bones.These issues have been discussed for some time, both inside and outside China, but they are being given extra prominence this year - because this year is the year of the tiger.

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 Posted: Thu Mar 11th, 2010 11:08 pm

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Lovelorn Wolverine Baffles Scientists

http://www2.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2010/03/09/MNPJ1CATHU.DTL
 



A lone wolverine discovered in California almost 90 years after the species supposedly went extinct here is apparently searching for a mate that he might never find.

The muscular carnivore with dark fur and a telltale almond-colored stripe was first photographed in 2008 roaming the Tahoe National Forest. The finding caused a sensation among wildlife experts, but nobody has yet figured out how the wolverine found its way to the Sierra - his nearest relative is thought to be two states away.

Hair samples and scat have been picked through by scientists, who say the wolverine is a male that came from Idaho, probably across the Sawtooth and Cascade ranges, a trek of at least 800 miles. "I wish we had the answers, said Amanda Shufelberger, a wildlife biologist for Sierra Pacific Industries, which has used a baited remote camera to photograph the animal several times over the past few weeks.

Girlfriend wanted Shufelberger calls the wolverine Buddy. A better name might be Randy. The peripatetic predator is apparently looking for action 20 miles northwest of Truckee. Photographs taken on Jan. 22 and a video montage on the timber company's Web site show him trying to impress other wolverines - which apparently aren't around - with masculine aromas.

"He marks his territory a lot," Shufelberger said. "It's breeding season, so he's probably feeling lonely right now and searching for a female. It is sad."

Last edited on Thu Mar 11th, 2010 11:18 pm by sydneyst

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 Posted: Wed Mar 3rd, 2010 11:36 pm

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Dear Fergie,


In response to longstanding efforts by the Center for Biological Diversity and allies, the National Marine Fisheries Service has proposed to protect more than 70,000 square miles of ocean waters off the coasts of California, Oregon, and Washington as "critical habitat" for the endangered Pacific leatherback sea turtle. This proposal is the first-ever to designate open ocean critical habitat for sea turtles in the continental United States and it represents a major step forward in pulling this majestic species back from the brink of extinction.
But more needs to be done if we're to save leatherbacks. 


These ocean-going giants encounter a gauntlet of deadly longlines and gillnets on their journey across the Pacific, making entanglement and drowning in commercial fishing gear one of the primary causes of the leatherback mortality. Those that survive the journey need and deserve strong protection from such threats when they reach our waters to feed.


The Fisheries Service's current proposal excludes consideration of commercial fishing gear as a threat to safe migration and feeding by turtles
-- even though entanglement and drowning in commercial fishing gear is a leading cause of mortality for leatherbacks and other sea turtles.

Please take action today
to tell the Fisheries Service to strengthen its proposed critical habitat protection by addressing fishing gear as well as including all necessary migratory and feeding areas.



Click here to find out more and take action.



Sample letter:

Subject: Protect Sea Turtle Habitat - RIN 0648-AX06


I am writing to support the National Marine Fisheries Service's proposed designation of more than 70,000 square miles critical habitat for leatherback sea turtles off the coasts of California, Oregon, and Washington. I also urge the Fisheries Service to strengthen this proposal by addressing the very real threat that commercial fishing gear poses to the habitat's value for safe passage and feeding, as well as by expanding the areas included in the designation.

I applaud the Fisheries Service's decision to designate the first expanse of open-water critical habitat for sea turtles. The best available science shows that the waters off the U.S. West Coast provide crucial foraging habitat and migratory corridors for the critically endangered Pacific leatherback sea turtle. Providing strong, expansive protection for this area is necessary to ensure this species' survival and recovery.

The best available science also shows that commercial fishing gear, including gillnet and longline gear, is a serious impediment to the leatherback sea turtle's safe passage through its ocean habitat. The agency's conclusion in the proposed critical habitat rule that fishing gear does not impair the habitat's value for passage and feeding defies common sense and is contrary to scientific evidence. The Fisheries Service must address this threat in its final critical habitat designation. 


In addition to considering fishing gear as an impediment to passage, the final critical habitat rule must ensure that the current Leatherback Conservation Area protections, which include closing the area to drift gillnet fishing from August to November, remain in place. The full extent of this area should also be incorporated into the final critical habitat area to ensure that these protections are upheld for at least as long as this antiquated gear is allowed to operate in U.S. waters.


Finally, the Fisheries Service should closely re-examine the ecological value of the areas it has excluded from the proposed critical habitat designation. The final designation should include all areas necessary to ensure that leatherbacks have ample foraging areas to support their survival and recovery, as well as safe passage to foraging areas throughout all West Coast waters. 


In sum, the Pacific leatherback needs the strongest protection possible if the species is to survive and recover. Thank you for your consideration.

Last edited on Wed Mar 3rd, 2010 11:37 pm by sydneyst

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 Posted: Mon Feb 15th, 2010 03:05 pm

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Video Shows Rare Clouded Leopard of Borneo

http://news.bbc.co.uk/earth/hi/earth_news/newsid_8505000/8505785.stm
(scroll down the page to the picture of the leopard)


A Clouded Leopard at the Feline Conservation Center, Rosamond, California
The Sundaland clouded leopard, a recently described new species of big cat, has been caught on camera.

The film, the first footage of the cat in the wild to be made public, has been released by scientists working in the Dermakot Forest Reserve in Malaysia. The Sundaland clouded leopard, only discovered to be a distinct species three years ago, is one of the least known and elusive of all cat species.

"Clouded leopards are one of the most elusive cats. They are very hardly ever ncountered and almost no detailed study about their ecology has been conducted," says Mr Andreas Wilting of the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research in Berlin, Germany. 

 
The leopard was filmed during the team's night surveys.

This leopard is now known as the Sunda or Sundaland clouded leopard (Neofelis diardi), though it was previously and erroneously called the Bornean clouded leopard. Since 2008, it has been listed as vulnerable by the IUCN.

The clouded leopard, the largest predator on Borneo, appears to live at very low densities within the reserve, as it has only rarely been photographed by the researchers or camera traps.

As well as capturing images of the clouded leopard, the researchers also recorded four other wild cat species.


Last edited on Mon Feb 15th, 2010 03:20 pm by sydneyst

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 Posted: Sat Feb 13th, 2010 09:03 pm

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Tiger Farms in China Feed Thirst for Parts:
Strange Way to Celebrate Year of the Tiger

excerpts from: http://www.nytimes.com/2010/02/13/world/asia/13tiger.html


Shiho Fukada for The New York Times Some tigers roam treeless, fenced-in areas at the Xiongsen Tiger and Bear Mountain Village in Guilin. Many others are packed in small cages. Until two years ago, the farm sold tiger steaks.
excerpts from article By ANDREW JACOBS Published: February 12, 2010

GUILIN, China — The crowd-pleasing Year of the Tiger, which begins Sunday, could be a lousy year for the estimated 3,200 tigers that still roam the world’s diminishing forests.

China's largest tiger farm is in Guilin and holds 1,500 tigers.

China, the country’s tigers are a few gun blasts away from extinction, and in India poachers are making quick work of the tiger population, the world’s largest. The number there, around 1,400, is about half that of a decade ago and a fraction of the 100,000 that roamed the subcontinent in the early 20th century.

Shrinking habitat remains a daunting challenge, but conservationists say the biggest threat to Asia’s largest predator is the Chinese appetite for tiger parts. Despite a government ban on the trade since 1993, there is a robust market for tiger bones, traditionally prized for their healing and aphrodisiac qualities, and tiger skins, which have become cherished trophies among China’s nouveau riche.

With pelts selling for $20,000 and a single paw worth as much as $1,000, the value of a dead tiger has never been higher, say those who investigate the trade. Last month the Indian government announced a surge in killings of tigers by poachers, with 88 found dead in 2009, double the previous year. Because figures are based on carcasses found on reserves or tiger parts seized at border crossings, conservationists say the true number is far higher.

“All of the demand for tiger parts is coming from China,” said Belinda Wright, executive director of the Wildlife Protection Society of India. “Unless the Chinese change their attitude, the tiger has no future on this earth.”

Although conservationists say India must do a better job of policing its 37 tiger reserves, they insist that the Chinese government has not done all it can to quell the domestic market for illicit tiger parts. Anti-trafficking efforts are haphazard, experts say; China bans the use of tiger parts in traditional Chinese medicine but overlooks the sale of alcohol-based health tonics steeped in tiger bone.

It is a gray area that has been exploited by Chinese tiger farms, which raise thousands of animals with assembly-line efficiency.

...In addition to overlooking the sale of tiger wine, the Chinese government has fueled the market in tiger parts by letting such farms exist, critics say. Although the State Forestry Administration reiterated its support for the ban on the trade of tigers last December, it reconsiders the restrictions each year, giving hope to the politically powerful owners of China’s 20 tiger farms.

If the ban were lifted, critics say, trade in farm-bred tigers would simply provide cover for poached tigers, which are far cheaper to harvest and bring in far higher prices because most Chinese believe the healing properties of wild tigers are greater than those raised in cages.

An employee at the forestry administration said the entire staff was away on a retreat and could not be reached.

Debbie Banks, who runs the tiger campaign at the Environmental Investigation Agency in London, said China’s stated resolve to help end the international trade in tigers was diluted by its ambivalent stand on domestic sales. “The government is stimulating and perpetuating demand, which is the real problem we’re facing,” she said.

Despite the grim news, conservationists say the coming year also presents an opportunity to raise awareness about the problem. All the hoopla surrounding the Year of the Tiger has captured the attention of many nations, especially China, whose government is sensitive to criticisms that it is encouraging the tiger’s extinction. In September, Russia and the World Bank will host a summit meeting on tigers that conservationists hope will yield a solid plan to restore plummeting tiger populations.
James Compton, Asia program director for TRAFFIC, which monitors the global wildlife trade, thinks the most important step would be for China and other nations to elevate the interdiction of tiger parts to that of illicit drugs. “It’s not rocket science to knock out the big traders,” he said, adding that bodies like Interpol and the World Customs Organization should take on the fight.

Guarded optimism aside, Mr. Compton cannot help but recall the last time the Year of the Tiger came around, in 1998. There was similar talk then of using the occasion to marshal the international community. He also has a vivid memory of the poster produced for the occasion. Its pitch: “Save the Last 5,000 Tigers.”

Last edited on Sat Feb 13th, 2010 09:18 pm by sydneyst

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 Posted: Mon Feb 8th, 2010 01:36 pm

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In Year of the Tiger China Works to Save Majestic Siberians

http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2010/feb/07/china-tiger-year-amur-conservation

excerpts from the Guardian:


A white tiger rests inside an enclosure at Beijing zoo, February 8, 2010. Photograph: Vincent Thian/AP

From dawn to dusk a tiger survey team searches the mountain forests of Siberia for signs of the Amur Tiger – the biggest cat species in the world.

Next week, China will start the year of the tiger with fireworks in a drive to stem the decline of 
Asia's most powerful wildlife symbol.

Since the last tiger year, in 1998, the wild population of the animal worldwide has almost halved to about 3,200 due to habitat loss, economic development and poaching for hides and traditional medicine.

China has been among the worst affected. The South China tiger, which has not been seen for many years, is feared to have followed the Bali, Caspian and Java subspecies into extinction in the wild. In the country's north, the population of the Amur tiger – which can grow to three metres in length and 300 kilograms – is estimated at 18 to 22.

Many of these animals are isolated from one another by roads and railways, making it difficult for them to breed.

Last week, the first Asian ministerial conference on tiger conservation, in Hua Hin, Thailand, set a goal of doubling the wild population by the start of the next tiger year, in 2022.

The Chinese government recently issued a directive calling for increased protection of wild tigers through ­habitat management, public education and stronger law enforcement action. In September, Vladivostok will host the first tiger summit, which is expected to be co-hosted by the Russian prime minister, Vladimir Putin, and the World Bank president, Robert Zoellick. While disputes remain about Chinese tiger farming and the use of tiger parts in traditional medicine, there are signs of co-operation.

The people in Hunchun will need to be convinced that it is in their interests to protect an animal often seen as a threat. In the last three years there have been more than 120 tiger attacks on farm animals and one human death.

Compensation has been increased. Che Jinxia, the last woman to survive an attack, received more than 50,000 yuan (about £5,000), a record.

The Wildlife Conservation Society is also trying to foster tiger eco-tourism in the region, partly through the launch last November of an annual Hunchun tiger festival. It will be expanded this year with a conservation marathon, exhibitions, forums, screenings and tiger-themed essay and art competitions.

"We want to appeal to nature lovers by showing that the tiger habitat is an ideal environment," said Sun Quanhai, the local director of the society. ­"Hunchun's forest coverage exceeds 80%. The local government have realised the importance of conservation and decided to make Hunchun the 'tiger town' of China."


Last edited on Mon Feb 8th, 2010 01:52 pm by sydneyst

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 Posted: Mon Jan 18th, 2010 12:15 pm

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Volcano Erupts Threatening Chimps; Gorillas Safe
Jan 03 2010

http://gorilla.wildlifedirect.org/

excerpts from BBC Report

Lava from a volcano in a sparsely populated area of the Democratic Republic of Congo is threatening rare chimpanzees, wildlife officials say.

Mount Nyamulagira, 25km (16 miles) from the eastern city of Goma, erupted at dawn on Saturday, sending lava into the surrounding Virunga National Park. About 40 endangered chimpanzees and other animals live in the area.But the country’s famous critically endangered mountain gorillas are said to be safe as they live further east.



Last edited on Mon Jan 18th, 2010 12:17 pm by sydneyst

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 Posted: Mon Jan 18th, 2010 12:08 pm

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Wildlife Direct Video Catches Gorilla Confrontation in Congo

 

http://gorilla.wildlifedirect.org/

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 Posted: Tue Dec 29th, 2009 07:08 pm

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Dear Fergie,


We need your help
to stop the brutal
killing of panthers.

...Just months after scientists declared that the loggerhead and leatherback sea turtles are spiraling toward extinction, the Obama administration tripled the number of sea turtles that can be caught by industrial fleets off the Hawaiian coast and increased the catch in the Gulf of Mexico by 700 percent.

We need your help to stop turtles from being brutally snagged on thousands of hooks attached to miles-long cables dragged through the ocean by massive fishing vessels. Worldwide, 200,000 loggerhead and 50,000 leatherback sea turtles are caught this way each year.

In the Center's fight to protect 1,000 species in 2010, we're already making progress for these ancient animals. We just filed simultaneous suits in Hawaii and Florida to strike down the federal killing plans. With your help today, we can see the cases through and reform out-of-date fishing practices before loggerhead and leatherback sea turtles go extinct. Our scientists and lawyers are also working hard to protect the endangered Florida panther.  



SARASOTA HERALD TRIBUNE
// December 25, 2009
By Kate Spinner

While the state's largest cats teeter on the edge of extinction, federal regulators are accused of hastening the Florida panther's demise over the last few years by allowing some of their best habitat to be bulldozed.

Between 2003 and 2008, federal regulators said they gave developers permission to build on nearly 25,000 acres that many scientists consider essential for the panthers' survival.

Three national environmental groups recently asked the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to set tougher development restrictions on panther land…Public Employees for Environmental Responsibility, the Center for Biological Diversity and the Council of Civic Associations are preparing to sue the government, likely next month…

Before the government approves any other developments, the environmental groups want to see the service identify the panthers' critical habitat, a formal designation required by the Endangered Species Act of 1974…For the panther, that amounts to about 3 million acres south of the Caloosahatchee River, conservationists say.

"The first priority is to protect the habitat for the existing population," said Michael Robinson, a conservation advocate for the Center for Biological Diversity, in New Mexico. "If we lose that population, that's it for the Florida panther."

Last edited on Tue Dec 29th, 2009 07:10 pm by sydneyst

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 Posted: Sun Dec 27th, 2009 12:12 pm

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Parrot Conservation in Pantanal: Great Video

http://blueparrot.wildlifedirect.org/


exerpts:

During the past two months, Vandir, Veronica, Thyago and I have been monitoring a nest of blue-fronted Amazon with a microcamera in Pantanal. And now we share with you this fantastic video, which is the first record of a parental care inside the nest of blue-fronted Amazons!

It took us about 110 hours of observations and filming in the nest, plus some more filming of the tree cavity with a regular camera. We registered the parental care with their 4 eggs, and later, with their 3 nestlings (unfortunately one egg did not hatch). The female has always been very careful, feeding and keeping the nestling warm. The male, always very attentive with the female, fed her on her beak, and helped to feed the nestlings.

Parrots are very faithful with their partner, having a life-long relationship! In the reproductive season, their main duty is to defend the nest against intruder parrots and other animals.In this video you will see the three nestlings, with about 32 to 39 days of age, asking for food, and being fed by their mother.

To be able to film the nest, and watch the eggs hatch and the nestling grow, is a very special and emotional moment for our team! And we are happy to be able to share with you this unique experience!

Enjoy!

Glaucia Seixas

 


Last edited on Sun Dec 27th, 2009 12:26 pm by sydneyst

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 Posted: Sun Dec 27th, 2009 11:52 am

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Fishery Services Study Says Loggerheads at Risk


Excerpts from The Oregonian, NMFS and Center for Bilogical Diversity
http://www.oregonlive.com/environment/index.ssf/2009/08/loggerhead_turtles_are_at_risk.html
http://www.nmfs.noaa.gov/pr/pdfs/statusreviews/loggerheadturtle2009.pdf5


Populations of loggerhead sea turtles on both the Pacific and Atlantic coasts are at risk for extinction, according to a report {in August} by the National Marine Fisheries Service. Pacific loggerheads, which nest in Japan and migrate to Hawaii and the waters off California -- and occasionally as far north as Oregon and Washington -- are being decimated by coastal fisheries off Japan, Mexico and by longline fisheries in the deep seas.One study estimates that 30,000 loggerheads were caught throughout the Pacific in 2000. In the past, the world's loggerhead population was lumped together and were considered threatened -- but not endangered.

But the fisheries service report followed nine loggerhead populations distributed across the globe. Experts with the Loggerhead Biological Review Team studied each population and assessed its status.

Of the nine populations, only two -- one in the Southwest Indian Ocean and the other in the South Atlantic Ocean -- were not in immediate risk of extinction. The others, including populations in the North and South Pacific Ocean, were at risk of extinction.

On May 28, the
Center for Biological Diversity, Oceana and the Sea Turtle Restoration Project filed a federal complaint, claiming the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the National Marine Fisheries Service violated the Endangered Species Act by not increasing protection for threatened and endangered sea turtles.

Oceana has asked the fisheries board to list the North Pacific and Northwest Atlantic loggerheads as endangered and designate critical habitat and other actions to help the populations recover.

Last edited on Sun Dec 27th, 2009 11:56 am by sydneyst

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 Posted: Tue Dec 22nd, 2009 06:19 pm

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Dear Fergie,


Just months after federal scientists declared that the loggerhead sea turtle is spiraling toward extinction, the Obama administration tripled the number of sea turtles that can be caught by industrial fleets off the Hawaiian coast and increased the catch in the Gulf of Mexico by 700 percent.

The turtles are brutally and painfully snagged on hooks dragged behind massive boats. Worldwide, 200,000 loggerhead and 50,000 leatherback sea turtles are caught each year.

That's why we're including them in our campaign to protect 1,000 species. Sea turtles can't survive this level of entanglement and killing -- especially not to prop up industrial fishing fleets that are also killing hundred of thousands of whales, sharks, sea otters, and sea birds in the same vicious way each year.

Please contribute to the Center for Biological Diversity's Endangered Species Action Fund today to stop the sea turtle killing.

We just filed simultaneous suits in Hawaii and Florida to strike down the federal killing plans. With your help we can see the cases through and reform these out-of-date fishing practices before loggerhead and leatherback sea turtles go extinct.

And right now, a generous donor will match all gifts given by December 31st, so your donation will count twice as much if you donate today.

Loggerheads and leatherbacks are just two of 1,000 plants and animals the Endangered Species Action Fund will allow us to save in 2010. This month we've already launched actions to save polar bears, plains buffalo, golden trout, and salmon. With your help we'll soon take action on behalf of creatures in every state including wolverines, tree frogs, gray wolves, spotted frogs, and Florida panthers.

Saving 1,000 plants and animals is the biggest campaign we've ever mounted -- the biggest campaign in the history of the Endangered Species Act. But with your help, we can save them all.


Kierán Suckling
Executive Director


 
We need your help
to stop the brutal killing
of sea turtles.



Last edited on Tue Dec 22nd, 2009 06:21 pm by sydneyst

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 Posted: Thu Dec 17th, 2009 10:45 pm

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Jaguar-killing Case Advances

Last Wednesday, the Center for Biological Diversity filed new court papers showing that that the Arizona Game and Fish Department is still claiming a right to risk the lives of endangered jaguars -- and it's even now risking their lives by trapping for mountain lions in potential jaguar habitat. Setting snares where jaguars may occur is just what the agency was doing when it captured -- and 12 days later killed -- the last known U.S. jaguar, Macho B.

The legal filings are part of the Center's ongoing lawsuit to stop the agency from doing anything likely to injure or kill other jaguars still surviving in the United States, or any that might move north of the Mexican border, until and unless the agency gets a permit to do so under the Endangered Species Act. Such a permit would include measures to minimize risks to jaguars.

 
Los Angeles Times.



Attached Image (viewed 310 times):

largejaguar.jpg

Last edited on Sun Dec 27th, 2009 11:55 am by sydneyst

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 Posted: Wed Nov 25th, 2009 08:29 pm

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Center for Biological Diversity Drops Hammer on USFWS Regarding Wolves

Feds Forewarned: Stop Neglecting Mexican Wolves

Last Friday, the Center for Biological Diversity warned the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service that we'll sue if it doesn't consider special protections for the Mexican gray wolf. In August, we filed a scientific petition to place this highly imperiled subspecies on the endangered species list separate from gray wolves nationwide. The Mexican wolf needs this distinction to ensure the development of a new recovery plan, which would lay out criteria for how many animals and what distribution are needed to deem it secure enough to remove from the endangered species list. But it's been more than 90 days since our petition, and the Service is still illegally ignoring it -- while genetic diversity in Mexican wolves continues to decline.

"The Mexican gray wolf has fallen through the cracks and is receiving insufficient protection," said Michael Robinson of the Center. "Timely action is essential."

Get more from the Associated Press.


Last edited on Wed Nov 25th, 2009 08:30 pm by sydneyst


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