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sydneyst
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 Posted: Tue Apr 17th, 2012 12:48 am

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A Good Day to Be up a Tree at Bifengxia

http://www.flickr.com/photos/iffybear/6349268076/

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pandasbifengixajpeg.jpg

Last edited on Tue Apr 17th, 2012 12:57 am by sydneyst

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 Posted: Thu Mar 22nd, 2012 11:29 pm

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Great Panda Cam Shots from Bifengxia 3-20-2012

http://explore.org/#!/live-cams/player/china-panda-cam-2

Last edited on Tue Apr 17th, 2012 12:48 am by sydneyst

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 Posted: Thu Dec 1st, 2011 04:35 pm

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photo from Giant Panda Reintroduction

China.com vai Pandas International



 

Last edited on Thu Dec 1st, 2011 05:18 pm by sydneyst

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 Posted: Thu Sep 1st, 2011 03:53 pm

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Panda Born at China Reintroduction Center
大熊猫锦竹在半野化环境成功产仔
2011.Jul.2915:38:44 [放归] 作者:qy 编辑:musa 来源:ccrcgp

  [size= ] 

 
锦竹出现破羊水焦躁等产前行为

China's Giant Pandas
Jin Zhu Gives Birth
Translated by lovecatbear on flickr






Jin Zhu

On July 29, Giant Panda Jin Zhu gave birth to a cub at the Hetaoping reintroduction training base in Wolong. This is the 4th cub (in the 3rd litter) born at the CCRCGP this year, after Su Lin and Xi Xi's cubs. Jin Zhu gave birth to the cub in a semi-wild enclosure, which will contribute to the reintroduction program.

In the early hours of July 29, researchers noticed, via the infrared cam, Jin Zhu showing signs of imminent birth such as pawing and biting at tree branches, groaning, etc. Her water broke at 9:58 a.m. At 11 a.m., Jin Zhu, went back to the den built against a rock. At 1:09 p.m., she gave birth to a cub in the den. Currently, both Jin Zhu and the cub are doing well.

Jin Zhu was transferred to the Hetaoping base on March 11 after having been bred at the Bifengxia Panda base in Ya'an. She was moved into a semi-wild enclosure early this month and her activity level and other physiological indexes were normal.



 
锦竹在半野化环境中产仔

 
锦竹小心翼翼带宝宝关键字:锦竹 产仔 野化 核桃坪 培训 卧龙 幼崽 

Last edited on Thu Sep 1st, 2011 03:54 pm by sydneyst

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 Posted: Thu Jul 14th, 2011 07:24 pm

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China Prepares for Panda Census

BEIJING - The forestry administration in Southwest China's Sichuan province launched a wild panda population survey at the weekend, which is the prelude to a new nationwide census of this endangered mammal.

More than 60 experts and officials attended a two-day training program at Wanglang Nature Reserve in Pingwu county of Sichuan province and they began the field study today, Qiu Jian, an official from the wildlife protection department of Sichuan Provincial Forestry Administration, told China Daily.








Pandas rest under some shade at the Chengdu Research Base of Giant Panda Breeding. [China Daily]



The census-takers are zoologists from the Chinese Academy of Sciences, panda experts from the country's 30 nature reserves and officials from the forestry departments in Sichuan, Shaanxi and Gansu provinces, Qiu said.

"We are going to count the number of wild pandas by studying their footprints and DNA analysis of their dung," said Zhang Zhihe, chief of the Chengdu Research Base of Giant Panda Breeding, who is participating in the pilot survey.

The State Forestry Administration will design procedures for a nationwide census based on the experiences from this pilot project and then expand the census to pandas across the country. There were 1,596 giant pandas living in China's mountain areas, according to the last survey conducted almost 10 years ago by the State Forestry Administration and World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF).

Official statistics show that the country's 62 nature reserves are home to 71 percent of China's panda population.


Last edited on Thu Jul 14th, 2011 07:28 pm by sydneyst

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 Posted: Fri Jul 1st, 2011 06:00 pm

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Eye-Witness Account of Wild Panda Encounter

Nature Conservancy Dep DirectosNature Conservancy's deputy director in China breathless.



By Cool Green Science Blog from The Nature Conservancy


SPOTTED: Giant panda photographed in China as part of a research project utilizing motion-activated camera-traps. ()

As part of a group study tour of The Nature Conservancy’s projects in China, I was in Pingwu County, northern Sichuan, with 24 other colleauges. We were visiting a site where we are thinking of deploying a conservation strategy that is roughly parallel to the U.S. conservation easement tool.
 
Pingwu County is completely vertical — it is the northwest edge of the consequence of the Indian sub-continent drifting into Asia and pushing the Tibetan plateau 14,000 feet into the air. Narrow valleys have roads pasted along their sides, towered above by enormous steep cliffs that often slough off the roads during the summer rains. 

 

This is also habitat for the few remaining wild pandas, China’s iconic wildlife species. Probably only about 2,000 pandas still exist in the fragmented habitat of Sichuan, but Pingwu county is a healthy patch in which they live. They are notoriously shy — some students receive there Ph.D.s without ever encountering one in the wild during their years of field research.
 
...But there we were, 25 of TNC’s best and brightest scientists and professionals from Africa, Latin America, China and other parts of Asia on an eight-day tour in two small buses zooming around the canyons of Pingwu. 

... Running out of trail after about 2 miles, I worked my way up a different side canyon in a dry creek bed for another 2 miles. As my conscience about keeping my colleagues waiting started to overcome my desire to keep exploring a landscape like none I had ever seen before — bamboo, huge trees, massive boulders, waterfalls dripping moss and fern — I slowed down.
 
And then I heard the oddest sounds. “Baaaaa. Baaaaa.” And some popping noises. I don’t know the birds of China well enough to identify by sound, so I stopped and looked up for a while. It continued and I could tell it was coming from one side of the canyon and was being answered from the other. Then I thought it might be a monkey — I’m a lawyer by training, so I don’t know their sounds either (though some would say lawyers are equally less evolved…). I kept listening and the sounds continued. I made my way up the creek and around a corner slowly, stopping and watching every so often.
 
Finally the “baaing” stopped. I climbed up onto a boulder to get a better view. Around 40 meters away I saw two pandas running up the steep slope away from me — and some movement in some nearby bushes that indicated a third.
 
I watched them until they disappeared into the dense brush — only about 5 seconds. I was stunned. At the time, I didn’t realize how special it was to see these animals this way, and I also wasn’t really sure what they would do to me if threatened. I have spent a lot of time around grizzlies in Wyoming and Montana, so was thinking that going forward to investigate might not be a great idea. But after a few minutes I couldn’t resist and hacked my way through the bamboo to where I had seen them in hopes of finding some evidence. I found lots of footprints and took a few pictures.
 
When I got down I described the sound to North Asia’s chief scientist, Matt Durnin, who has a Ph.D in pandas from U.C. Berkeley. He confirmed that was the sound and the footprints of a panda. I felt like I should have played the lottery that evening—the chances of seeing a wild panda in the only 45 minutes I would spend in their habitat that week must be astronomically slim. But sometimes it is better to be lucky than smart.
 
—Text by Charles Bedford, Cool Green Science Blog



Last edited on Fri Jul 1st, 2011 06:05 pm by sydneyst

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 Posted: Wed Jun 15th, 2011 06:53 pm

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2010 Panda Cubs' Names Released
 
from Panda's International:


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Last edited on Wed Jun 15th, 2011 07:05 pm by sydneyst

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 Posted: Wed May 11th, 2011 02:19 pm

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China Releases Panda Census

Population Up by 33 Percent in 30 Years

http://www.china.org.cn/environment/2010-08/02/content_20623812.htm

The population of giant pandas living in the wild in southwest China's Sichuan Province has risen by 33 percent in the last three decades to 1,206, the local government said.

"Altogether 1,206 giant pandas are living in the mountains of Sichuan, making up at least 76 percent of China's total," the provincial forestry department said in a press release Monday.

The endangered bears are found in 10 city and prefectural areas, including Chengdu, Deyang, Mianyang, Leshan, Meishan, Guangyuan, Aba, Garze and Liangshan, it said.

Another 246 pandas are living in captivity at the giant panda protection and research center in Wolong and the Chengdu research base, the world's two largest centers for artificial breeding of the bears.

Sichuan Province has 41 nature reserves for giant pandas covering 2.34 million hectares in total.

Panda experts in Sichuan have reported success in artificial insemination and breeding of giant pandas, a sex-shy species on the verge of extinction.

Even in 2008, when a massive earthquake shook most parts of Sichuan Province and destroyed panda's habitat in Wolong, 30 panda cubs were born and survived.

This year is set to see another baby boom, with seven cubs born so far at the Wolong base alone.

In its most recent figures published in 2004, the State Forestry Administration put China's giant panda population at 1,751, including at least 1,590 in the wild and 161 raised in captivity
 


Wild pandas are spotted frequently in this area of the Tangjiahe Nature Reserve. About 60 pandas have been found living in the reserve area. [Wang Qian/china.org.cn]

 

Last edited on Wed May 11th, 2011 02:28 pm by sydneyst

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 Posted: Wed May 11th, 2011 02:11 pm

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Panda Juvenile In Training for Release to Wild

 source:

http://www.china.org.cn/environment/2011-05/10/content_22532348.htm




Hetaoping Wilderness Training Base at the China Conservation and Research Center for the Giant Panda in Wenchuan, Sichuan Province. [Wang Qian/china.org.cn] 


Taotao was born to a captive father and a wild mother, Caocao, in Bifengxia Panda Base in Ya'an, just south of Wenchuan. He was selected for Wolong's wilderness training as part of a program that aims to improve the survival rate of captive pandas when they are released into the wild.


"We have begun selecting cubs of wild pandas for the wilderness training so the babies can learn survival skills from their wild mothers directly," said Wu Daifu, a worker at the Wolong station.

But time is still needed to see whether Taotao can survive in the wilderness. The wilderness training program only resumed last June, after its first and only panda to complete the training died less than a year after he was released into the wild in 2006.

"We are still at the stage of exploring and researching," Wu said. "It [the wilderness training program] is still full of uncertainties."

Pandas in the wilderness program go through three stages of training before being introduced into nature. Taotao has finished the first stage, five months in a 3,000-square-meter enclosure. He still had contact with humans, but workers minimized direct contact by wearing special panda-like clothing that seal off human scents.

Taotao and his mother have now transferred to their second training area, a much bigger enclosure of 40,000 square meters. Nearly 50 cameras are placed around the enclosure to observe their daily activities.

In addition, workers will give Taotao a physical check every three months. Wu said the second stage of training may last a year, after which Taotao will be transferred to a still bigger enclosure of 240,000 square meters.



A computer tracks Taotao's activities during the second stage of his training. [Wang Qian/china.org.cn]  

Last edited on Wed May 11th, 2011 02:16 pm by sydneyst

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 Posted: Wed May 11th, 2011 02:01 pm

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New Cub at San Diego Zoo

Bai Yun is Old Hand at Motherhood

http://www.bing.com/videos/watch/video/panda-gives-birth-in-san-diego/6guzqym?cpkey=e46a15ba-ab8f-4c6a-8f3b-34d19d250bd1%7C%7C%7C

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 Posted: Sun May 1st, 2011 04:29 pm

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Wild Panda Rescued in China

see:http://www.flickr.com/photos/97826829@N00/5656863065/

excerpted from Reuters report of April 25, 2011

A wild giant panda (see video) was rescued in the Aba Prefecture in northwestern Sichuan province on the Sothern rim of the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau.  The panda wandered into Fenghe Village where it was discovered by a villager. The panda was moving slowly with labored breathing.

Authorities and experts from the Forestry Bureau were summoned and a decision was made to send the panda to the China Giant Panda-Protection and Research Center for treatment.

Panda experts reported that the panda is  1.4 meters in length and weighs 60 kilograms.  It was dehydrated, weak, and suffering from hunger.  

Last edited on Sun May 1st, 2011 04:43 pm by sydneyst

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 Posted: Mon Mar 28th, 2011 05:32 pm

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Repatriated Pandas Doing Well at Bifengxia
New photos of returned pandas at the Bifengxia panda base


The China Giant Panda Protection Research Center which works out of the Bifengxia panda base has just released some new photos of Hua Mei, Mei Sheng, Su Lin, Zhen Zhen, Fu Long and Tai Shan.  Thanks so much to the base for posting these photos so we can keep up with our loving pandas.

Giant Panda Fu Long [male] at Ya'an Bifengxia Panda Base in China. He was born at Zoo Vienna in Austria in August 2007 to mother Yang Yang and father Long Hui.



Giant Panda Hua Mei [female] and her cub [sex unknown] at Ya'an Bifengxia Panda Base in China. She was born at the San Diego Zoo in California, U.S.A in August 1999 to mother Bai Yun and father Shi Shi.




Giant Panda Mei Sheng [male] at Ya'an Bifengxia Panda Base in China. He was born at the San Diego Zoo in California, U.S.A in August 2003 to mother Bai Yun and father Gao Gao.





Giant Panda Su Lin [female] at Ya'an Bifengxia Panda Base in China. She was born at the San Diego Zoo in California, U.S.A in August 2005 to mother Bai Yun and Father Gao Gao.





 

Giant Panda Zhen Zhen [female] at Ya'an Bifengxia Panda Base in China. She was born at the San Diego Zoo in California, U.S.A in August 2007 to mother Bai Yun and Father Gao Gao.







Giant Panda Tai Shan [male] at Ya'an Bifengxia Panda Base in China. He was born at the Smithsonian's National Zoological Park in Washington D.C., U.S.A. in July 2005 to mother Mei Xiang and father Tian Tian.



All these pandas are located in their own area know as the 'Overseas-born Panda Paradise' or as they call it, 'The Returnees ParK'.  They have this beautiful stone that sets at the entrance to the area. 

 



Last edited on Mon Mar 28th, 2011 05:34 pm by sydneyst

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 Posted: Tue Dec 7th, 2010 10:01 pm

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Giant panda breeding breakthrough in China

http://news.bbc.co.uk/earth/hi/earth_news/newsid_9225000/9225918.stm


By Ella Davies
Earth News reporter


A critical breakthrough has been made in efforts to save the giant panda, one that could kick-start attempts to reintroduce the animals to the wild.
Conservationists say they have perfected the difficult task of reproducing pandas, having reached their target of successfully raising 300 of the bears in captivity.

The breakthrough, mainly by scientists at the Chengdu Panda Breeding Research Centre, China, should lead to the first panda being reintroduced into the wild within 15 years.




Female pandas are only on heat for 72 hours a year, and can only actually become pregnant during a 12 to 24 hour window during this time.
The revelation comes after documentary makers were given unprecedented access to the research centre to film captive breeding activity over two years.


Just a few thousand wild pandas survive at best, and the species is classified as being Endangered.

In a bid to protect the animal, scientists have attempted to breed captive pandas since the first such cub was born in 1963.

But many obstacles stood in the way of achieving a stable captive panda population.

The first was the very short window of opportunity provided in the panda's natural reproductive cycle.

Pioneering research has overcome the poor sexual performance of captive pandas

Female pandas are only on heat for 72 hours a year, and can only actually become pregnant during a 12 to 24 hour window during this time.

In order to correctly interpret the bears' breeding potential, caring for captive female pandas required close observation including daily urine samples to monitor hormone levels.

Understanding the giant panda's natural patterns of reproduction was only the start of the challenge.

'Turned off'

Despite conservationists' best efforts to encourage mating, pandas were seemingly "turned off" by captivity.

In Chengdu, the world's most successful panda breeding centre, researchers attempted to entice male pandas with the scent of suitable females on bamboo poles, mimicking wild scent-marking behaviour.

Rare interactions between aroused pairs often ended in disappointment, however.

Male pandas have proportionately short penises meaning pairs must adopt a very exact position in order to mate.

During their observations, researchers found that pandas demonstrated poor knowledge of this position.




Last edited on Tue Dec 7th, 2010 10:05 pm by sydneyst

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 Posted: Mon Apr 19th, 2010 04:28 pm

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Bamboo: Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner of Champion Pandas


Posted at 4:40 pm April 14, 2010 by Karen Barnes 
Bamboo.  San Diego Zoo.

A grass, albeit one that looks like it’s on steroids. Giant panda food. An unwieldy food for keepers to prepare for pandas!

For new keepers to the panda area, the biggest learning curve is identifying the species of bamboo fed out to the pandas. There are some 20 species that tend to be available. That sounds like a lot of species to learn until one discovers there are over 1,200. Even so, in the beginning many of the species look very similar to the untrained eye. One hears comments like, “Ventricosa has crazy-looking branches,” or “Aurea and bambusoides are hardest to tell apart. Bambusoides stems are larger in diameter.” So many details of which to become aware! Since the supply varies day to day, comparison between species may take some time to accomplish.

We feed our 4 pandas approximately 200 pounds (90 kilograms) of bamboo each day. (Yun Zi, our youngest cub, is still nursing and has barely begun to ingest anything other than milk.) That’s a lot of bamboo to supply each day, each week, each year. The bamboo is harvested by our horticultural experts. The usual guy has been dubbed “Johnny Bamboo.” He travels around the Zoo and Wild Animal Park harvesting bamboo for our pandas. It’s a huge job. And a vital one.

The nutritionists have supplied diets for the pandas, determining how much each will be offered at each of the three daily feedings. For example, Bai Yun, our lactating female, receives about 55 pounds (25 kilograms) each day. She receives a large helping first thing in the morning, a smaller serving at midday, and the most in the afternoon to last her overnight.

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 Posted: Fri Apr 16th, 2010 12:08 pm

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Video Shows Yun Zi Climbing with Bai Yun

http://www.sandiegozoo.org/videos/?bcpid=4552241001&bclid=1631259758


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